Introduction time: An interest in the visual Web

Jay suggested that I introduce myself, now that I'm a new member of
your august community.

Briefly, I'm a veteran journalist, blogger, and consultant who has
just completed a book about the personal media revolution
("Darknet:
Remixing the Future of Movies, Music & Television," Wiley & Sons,
spring 2005). My blogs are New Media Musings, Darknet and Social
Media.

http://www.newmediamusings.com
http://www.darknet.com/
http://www.socialmedia.com

My interest in video blogging is twofold:

(1) Open Media
Marc Canter, Lucas Gonze and I are embarking on an open-source
project called Open Media with the twin goals of

– creating an open platform for video and other media

– creating a web site (soon to launch), Open-media.org, to house,
archive and access grassroots video.

Open Media's vision is to bring personal media to millions of
desktops through playlists, video jukeboxes, visual albums, and built-
in media libraries.

Brewster Kahle and his Internet Archive are supporting this project
with free storage and bandwidth for grassroots video works.

This week we launched an Open Media wiki to begin work on the
project. It's invitation-only; if you're interested in participating,
drop me an email and I'll get you in.

(2) Participatory media

I've been writing about participatory media for almost a decade, in
magazines and at the Online Journalism Review (www.ojr.org). Out of
that came "Darknet," which looks at how digital technologies are
empowering us to be users rather than passive consumers of big-media
content.

Two chapters in "Darknet" look at the coming era of Internet
television. As others on this list have said, this won't be
traditional television piped over IP, but an entirely new creature.

For instance, I interviewed Raven, who runs the Internet TV station
Daytonabeach-live.com in Florida. I interviewed a fellow in LA who
wants to head up a real-time TV network with interactive mistresses.
And, on a somewhat loftier plane, I interviewed Warren Lieberfarb,
father of the DVD, who is now a consultant for Microsoft working on
next-generation projects involving amateur video on demand.

So, I'm interested in the entire landscape of the visual Web, both to
keep on top of it as a journalist, blogger and consultant, and, who
knows?, to mine the field for possible business opportunities down
the road.

JD Lasica